Wreaths, statues, and classical accents adorned the stage, as a spotlight illuminated Grossi’s frame with divine rays. A rare tranquility descended upon the music hall as he settled in and hugged his harp, accompanied by choir, string quartet, and bandmates. Active Child’s set began with calm and moody favorites like "Johnny Belinda," "High Priestess" and “Hanging On” that helped to build his initial acclaim. By mid-show, Grossi swapped strings for synths to jam out to newer songs. Noticeably, the EP tracks like “Calling in the Name of Love” and “Feeling Is Gone” still showcase Grossi’s distinctive falsetto but they feature fatter beats and power synths found across 80’s New Wave/Pop and 90’s R&B. Performing song after song with confidence and control, it was clear that Grossi was in his zone.

Singles “Subtle” and “Silhouette”, which include top features from Mikky Ekko and Ellie Goulding, concluded the night and by the sounds of audience vocals, it was a good choice.

For a guy who recently was playing free residencies on the Eastside, Active Child has certainly come a long way. Cheers to that!

https://soundcloud.com/active-child/sets/rapor-ep Opening the show was Lawrence Rothman and JMSN." rel="nofollow" title="ACTIVE CHILD: HARP, HARMONIES & HOMECOMING AT THE EL REY ' />

A NOSTALGIC HAZE: JONATHAN WILSON’S “LOVE TO LOVE”

It’s the haze of an era, and the [mostly] false promises of big city lights that make Jonathan Wilson’s video for Love to Love more than just a pretty visual – there’s a feeling that we may not be able to explain looming. Nostalgia is consistent throughout this 1970s-esque, cinematic journey of Los Angeles (and at that time, we weren’t even in the womb yet). With a mixture of iconic terrain and landscapes only a local could recognize make Love to Love more than just a music video, but an aesthetically pleasing, evocative moment with a great song as score.

 

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